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2012-10-15

Leaked Ghannouchi tape raises salafism concerns

By Houda Trabelsi for Magharebia in Tunis – 15/10/12

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A leaked video featuring Ennahda leader Rachid Ghannouchi strategising with young salafist leaders is causing controversy in Tunisia.

In the video, which was first broadcast last April and re-broadcast October 9th, Ghannouchi said, "The secularists are still controlling the media, economy and administration. Therefore, controlling them would require more time." He added that "the police and army's support for Islamists is not guaranteed, and controlling them would also require more time."

"I tell our young salafists to be patient... Why hurry? Take your time to consolidate what you have gained," Ghannouchi said before advising them to "create television channels, radio stations, schools and universities" to push their agenda.

The Ennahda leader said, "We've met with Hizb ut-Tahrir, and the salafists, including Sheikh Abou Iyadh and Sheikh al-Idrissi."

Abou Iyadh, also known as Seif Allah Ben Hassine, is currently wanted by Tunisian police in connection with the September 14th attack on the US embassy.

In the video, Ghannouchi said he was "not afraid" to include an article in the new constitution on Sharia law. He went on to mock secularists who accept Islam and fear Sharia. "They are like those who accepted content but rejected the name itself," he said.

He also told the salafists about achievements that were made for them after Ennahda came to office. "The government is now at the hands of Islamists, the mosques are ours now, and we've become the most important entity in the country," he said.

"The Islamists must fill the country with associations, establish Qur'anic schools everywhere, and invite religious preachers because people are still ignorant of Islam," Ghannouchi continued. In his first reaction to the leaking of video, Ghannouchi said that his words were "taken out of context", adding that the secularism he denounced was "the radical and extreme secularism".

"My words were misunderstood," Ghannouchi said. "I was only debating with a number of salafist young men so that they may not deal lightly with the police, army and state, and nothing else."

After the release of the controversial video where Ghannouchi told salafists to adopt a policy of gradual changes to consolidate Islamists' control over the government, 75 representatives demanded the dissolution of Ennahda for what they said was a conspiracy against civil state.

Hatem Farahat, a lawyer, filed a legal action against Rachid Ghannouchi and accused him of "conspiring against the country's internal security".

In her turn, opposition Republican Party Secretary-General Maya Jribi said that "what Rachid Ghannouchi said in the video is a plan to build a non-civil state to undermine the state and destroy trust between components of society."

"The more dangerous thing is condoning extremist entities and urging them to gradually build an extremist religious state," she added. "The election and political process in Tunisia are threatened by this speech."

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  1. Anonymous thumb

    انسان 2013-2-16

    To you who want to instill ideas by force and terror, on whose behalf are you talking and who have mandated you? You are only ignoramuses, you don’t understand anything about Islam. All you do is just damaging religion. The Creator is the only one Who holds His creatures accountable. So let aside these ideas from which you only reap hatred and animosity.

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    jean Bierer 2013-2-6

    You are trying to destroy the Muslim world. It’s too late. The transmission speed of the media through the various TV, Internet, etc. channels makes the future of the Islamists and salafists quite clear. You have to know that the world is seething and no one will stop this right path that has been drawn by Allah. Who could say any better? The secularists are hiding behind the salafists’ curtain. Why? They are miscreants of Allah. The Holy Book transmitted by Allah to Mohamed reveals good things to those who understand. Amen! Amen!

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    amazigh 2013-2-1

    Any person who calls religion into political discourse is a threat to democracy, peace, and development. It’s that simple. The North African peoples should protest to establish secularism. It’s from this that they will be able to taste happiness and justice.

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    kherazi 2013-2-1

    Where is the video? I didn’t see it. I am Algerian and I hope that our Tunisian brothers get over this crisis without any loses. Try to listen to each other to find a solution for yourselves and your dear Tunisia. Violence has never solved any problems; on the contrary, it causes them. This is an advice from an Algerian.

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    sami 2013-1-26

    I am a fan of Ennahda.

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    محمد أبو مروان 2013-1-7

    We import anything and everything from the West, just whatever suits our moods. We take from the word democracy only its crust not the crumb. This is exactly the case of liberal and leftist parties in general. Leftist Marxists praise progressiveness, when we all know that the Marxist ideology is generally a backward molded ideology even if it raises the slogan of dialectic. Moreover, liberalism didn’t grow up on our land. It came as a ready-made slogan from the West after sour conflict with authorities and the church. In addition, Europeans realized in general that in spite of their differences of cultures and ethnicities, European unity is decisive if they really want to be in touch with their reality. However, Arab countries which emerged of Arab revolutions and are generally liberal and leftist tried hard to fight the right and conservatives in general. They try as much as possible to create a vertical schism between fighting religiousness, attributing to it the feature of backwardness and terrorism and the attempt to exclude it while lifting the slogans of democracy. Is it time for us to put an end to contemplation and review our exclusionary policies of unity, time to renounce division and give metaphysics an important and fundamental role in this phase? This is because we know that the positive political ideology is corroded and is no longer accepted nowadays, when we see the collapse of historical materialism as well as the bourgeois ideology which is now swaying from America to European countries. Shall we Arabs try to ruminate our religion and respect our faith since this is our rescue ship if we really want to go through the twenty-first century with a spirit of unity and solidarity?

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    haroun 2013-1-6

    I’m proud to be Algerian and Amazigh. May the Arabs and their salafists leave us in peace. We were alone in fighting the now dissolved FIS, God does not respond. We are proud of our stability. God willing, the FLN forever!

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    slimani 2013-1-3

    This is the very nature of all Islamist movements!!!

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    ZAHRA 2012-12-28

    Thank you!

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    lylia 2012-12-10

    Islamism is dictatorship. It means no freedom, no democracy and no rights for women and children. The Family Code is violated. Why do the Arabs love dictatorship? It’s because they adore oppression. Even women are undervalued and reduced to nothing. Tunisian women must absolutely not submit themselves to the will of these dictators who claim to be fanatics for God. Fight, women. Wrench your rights to the very end. This is the decline of Islamism in politics.

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    Essid 2012-12-7

    [11/11] • (4) WATCH THE VIDEO WITH ALL THIS IN MIND: If you remember how much the former regime and neighbouring regimes and former colonial powers have perverted the idea of secularism; if you remember how one must present an argument in terms and vocabulary that the audience will understand given their history (for example, as victims of political repression) and will perceive as beneficial toward their wants; and if you take into consideration the political record of Ghannouchi as a dissident against Ben Ali, a critic of extremism and now a political leader, then you will have a very different perspective on this video. You will very likely see a political leader who is trying to convince people to calm down and take part in public debate rather than revert to violence and destabilize the country. • But it’s completely illogical and even destructive to fall into the trap of a neighbour or an old opposite that wants to repress religion in its own country and wants to do some fear-mongering in order to destabilize Tunisia to fool its own population into think that the Islamists are dangerous, when most of them simply are afraid of the old regime’s repression. • As secularists, we must find common grounds with the Islamists and explain that the solution to religious repression (that is, false secularism) is not oppression by the religious (that is, a religious state), but true secularism to protect the freedom to practice religion. It is up to us to demonstrate ourselves as being compassionate of the fact that they have suffered so much under the false secularism and wanting that they be free to practice their faith.

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    Essid 2012-12-7

    [10/11] • In fact, the only thing Ghannouchi has done is demand the state’s protection of religious freedoms for those who want to engage in religious practices and rites and the state’s non-interference in these practices and rites. And this is precisely what he has said to Tunisian secularists. • In other words, Ghannouchi is a true secularist, even if he avoids using the word secularism due to the perversion of the term by previous regimes. And this too is precisely what he has said to Tunisian secularists. • As such, it seems glaringly obvious that Ghannouchi is not ordering salafists and Islamists to take power over the country, but encouraging them to take part civil society by building their own structures to gain support and participate in dialogue. • (NOTE: Like all groups and structures allowed and encouraged to participate in civil society and public discourse, once the salafists and Islamists see the limit of their support, they will become more moderate in order to gain the middle ground of the population. However, if you eliminate a group from participating in civil society and public discourse, you only ensure that they become more extreme because when they exist in the shadows, they have no opposing discourse to challenge their ideas and they rely on the support of the most extreme, desperate, uneducated and capricious. And I have no doubt that Ghannouchi is aware of this given his discussions of extremism in the past, a movement that he also spoke against during his years of vocal dissidence while Ben Ali was in power.)

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    Essid 2012-12-7

    [9/11] To the salafists and Islamists he says that he wants them to bide their time and build structures in order to spread their ideology and gain more influence than the secularists. So what are his sincere motivations? • Ghannouchi was simply speaking a language that he felt the salafists and Islamists would understand, asking them to create structures to spread their ideas and gain support for their ideas and, in this way, become a peaceful part of democratic debate in the public sphere. His reference to secularism was very likely not to the true secularism, but to the false secularism of Ben Ali and his supporters, many of whom are still vying for power in the new political landscape. • The following is the reasoning for this conclusion… • (3) GHANNOUCHI’S PAST AS A POLITICIAN AND DURING THE PERIOD BEFORE BECOMING ONE: If you look at Ghannouchi’s activities since taking office, it is impossible to find a case where he has imposed religion on anyone. He has not tried to require anyone to wear a hijab or to wear religious clothing or to not shave or to not wear makeup or to cover their face, etc.. He has not tried to institute a religious police (even if certain propagandists from the old regime and the neighbouring regime want to pretend that “religious police” means a group of citizens who offer advice and mediation to those who voluntarily seek it in cases of conflict not in violation of the law). He has not tried to force anyone to pray on Fridays. He has not tried to deprive women of any rights.

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    Essid 2012-12-7

    [8/11] • (2) THE PSYCHOLOGY OF CONFLICT RESOLUTION: It is much more difficult to identify Ghannouchi’s motivations in this video than the author of this article would have you think, and this is largely because Ghannouchi is a politician, and politicians as a general rule are masters of convincing people. • The psychology of conflict resolution revolves around one central tenet: demonstrate to one or both groups that they have an interest in doing what the other group wants and vice versa. If Ghannouchi wants the Islamists, salafists, etc. to be less aggressive, then his best option is to portray a peaceful, soft approach to gaining influence in media, education, etc. as being in their best interest. If Ghannouchi were to say “Stop being aggressive. You are wrong to impose your views on others, especially through violence!”, it would very likely fall on deaf ears. But if Ghannouchi says “You must take your time and work to develop institutions and structures to support your beliefs and convictions so that you may spread them through society and gain influence over the secularists,” then he is much more likely to be heard by the salafists and islamists, who may believe that he is recommending a winning strategy. • And we must never forget that Ghannouchi is a politician, which means that he has an interest in maintaining the support of as many people as possible, regardless of their leanings. • That said, it is difficult to know Ghannouchi’s motivations. To the secularists he says that he does not want the state to impose religion.

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    Essid 2012-12-7

    [7/11] • At this point, the spectrum of true versus false secularism is understood, and it is clear that Ben Ali’s regime was not truly secular, but was perverting the idea of secularism to repress religious elite who could criticise him and religion itself, which could be a forum for meeting and discussing loyally dissident ideas. (Yes, one can be and should be loyally dissident if the interest in criticizing is for the benefit of the wellbeing of the country and its people.) • And that brings us to January 2011 and, more importantly, to Ennahda’s victory in the legislative elections. It should not be surprising that the majority of the electorate voted for Ennahda: (A) “Secularism” in Tunisia was widely understood as the repression of religion because that is exactly what it had been for nearly two centuries; (B) Ben Ali’s corruption and contempt for human dignity, particularly toward the end of his tyranny, made him the most vivid “evil” in the general population’s mind; and (C) the most obvious contrast to Ben Ali’s regime was religion since it had been around forever in people's minds, the religious elite had been victim of Ben Ali and the elite itself invented or, at least, perpetuated a mythology about the “good old days” of an umma to create nostalgia for a religious state that never existed. The result was that the majority of the electorate was not only wary of anything with the label “secular”, but also sympathetic and nostalgic for religion in public life, even though the nostalgia was based on a fiction and some of the religious elite who was victim of Ben Ali was no better than Ben Ali. • That concludes the discussion of secularism during the last half-century in Tunisia.

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    Essid 2012-12-7

    [6/11] There were many people who were dissidents for personal gain, not out of selfless love for the country, and, unfortunately, this included some people who were willing to use sectarianism and intolerance to manipulate people. • Had there been true secularism to protect religious officials from politics, this downward spiral could have been avoided. The religious elites could, with true secularism, discuss life in general, which includes criticising politicians when they violate the dignity of their citizenry. And, the government would not be seen as a shameful repressor of religion and violator of dignity—in short, as “evil”—and, therefore, the words of the religious elite would not automatically be taken for “good” since the dichotomy of good and bad is absent. Instead, true secularism would have planted the roots of discussion and not of rhetoric. • Unfortunately, this has not been the history of secularism in Tunisia for the last half century, which is not surprising since Tunisia’s former coloniser, France, had the same false secularism. (And France still practices this false, tyrannical secularism against its Muslim population, largely because today’s tyrants are pandering to a large minority of Islamophobes, all while encouraging Islamaphobia in order to divert attention from their own failings. Again, it is a vicious cycle.)

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    Essid 2012-12-7

    [5/11] By depriving people of the ability to practice their religion freely, the tyrant attempts to dismantle their religious convictions, thereby demotivating them from partaking in religious activities and depriving the religious elite of their audience. • Another example was Ben Ali’s control over the appointment of imams. Not only does this illustrates the complete lack of true secularism under Ben Ali, but it also highlights the importance of true secularism (because of its absence). The only imams that were legally allowed to lead prayers were the imams who kowtowed to Ben Ali. However, the longstanding institution of Islam afforded some protection to the imams who refused to submit to Ben Ali. This was not protection in the physical sense, but in the ideological sense. Once a person became aware of the corruption and aggressiveness of Ben Ali’s regime, they were susceptible to believe that anyone who criticised Ben Ali, particularly if they claimed to be religious, was a “good” man. Many Tunisians are smart enough to recognize intolerance and extremism on both sides (the political side that was Ben Ali and religious side that was his opposition), but many Tunisians, particularly the poor, who are desperate and often deprived of education, and the young, who are capricious, were susceptible to the dichotomy of “Ben Ali = bad” and “anti-Ben Ali = good”. Unfortunately, the truth of the matter was that “Ben Ali = bad”, but that did not mean that everyone who was anti-Ben Ali was good.

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    Essid 2012-12-7

    [4/11] For the tyrant, his shameful actions largely go unnoticed (except by other intellectuals) and this is because he controls the media and because Tunisians are not very involved in academic life. • The result is that the only intellectuals that used to survive were those who either self-censored their criticisms or were brainwashed into genuinely believing the tyrant’s propaganda. • However, it is the complete opposite when it comes to the “disappearance” of a religious elite. If a religious elite criticizes the tyrant and the tyrant tries to “silence” it, then the Muslims who worship at the mosque where the religious elite gives sermons will know and they will spread this news. Moreover, since most Tunisians believe that religion automatically has moral undertones, the tyrant’s aggressions on the religious elite will almost immediately be seen as immoral and shameful by a large portion of the population. • This is the source of the second type of secularism. It is an attack on religious establishment. It seeks to deprive people of their religious freedoms in places where the practice of religion has no impact one way or another on a persons’ ability to function in society. For example, Ben Ali banned the hijab for no reason. Religious clothing does not affect people’s ability to be a student or to work in the private or public sector, but Ben Ali wanted to put a wedge between people and religion.

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    Essid 2012-12-7

    [3/11] • The first type of secularism, true secularism, seeks to protect the right of the individual to worship (or not to worship) and to practice their religion (or not to practice their religion) as they see fit so long as it does not interfere with others’ rights to do the same., and this requires that religion not have authority over the state and the state not have authority over religion. As such, the state’s only relationship to religion is as the guarantor of religious freedom, not the imposer of religious thought. This is the secularism of countries like, for example, Canada. • The second type of secularism is the bad doppelganger of the first type. The second type of secularism is the abuse of the idea of secularism to bar political opposition. Tunisia’s political system has, until very recently, always been a tyranny in one way or another—either a dictatorship or a colony. In any case, the tyrants always sought to exclude not only all political opposition, but all legitimate criticism, and religious elites have always been a source of criticism and a structure within which people could organize their ideas and mobilize themselves. Why? The reason is easy enough to understand, but often ignored: history. Political science, sociology, psychology, anthropology, etc.—none of these have a popular history in Tunisia. So, when a political scientist or a sociologists criticizes the tyrant, he is threatened and his family is threatened, and if the threats do not produce the “desired results”, then he (and perhaps his family with him) disappears, which is a euphemism to say that he is kidnapped, tortured, raped and/or murdered.

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    Essid 2012-12-7

    [2/11] There are also many religious demagogues who seek to confiscate political authority by manipulating their followers and use it to impose their own interests. • This first type of secularism is the idea that religion and government must be kept separate from each other in order for people as individuals and as a society to enjoy utmost political and religious freedom. This is to say, no political elite (and no religious elite who has confiscated political power) can tell people how to worship or how to behave in conformance with religion. (Note: I know that some people will say “But we are a Muslim country, you should behave as Muslim or get out!” We are not a Muslim country; we are a multi-religious country, where the majority of the population is Muslim. However, that does not mean that the majority has the right to impose on the religious freedoms of the minority. More importantly, everyone has his own interpretation of Islam. What happens if the theocrat suddenly decides to cut off the hands of thieves, including children, and stone women that are raped because they do not have four witnesses to testify in their favour? What I mean is that if people do not have democratic control over their leaders, but instead do relinquish their power to a non-elected theocrat, they have no idea which interpretation that theocrat will adopt, much less the theocrats who follow him. • This first type of secularism is also a way to avoid interference in religious practices, trying to distort religion to one's personal interests.

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    Essid 2012-12-7

    [1/11] • This is not Algeria. This is Tunisia. Tunisia doesn’t need people—or rather someone pretending to be many people—to twist facts and distort reality, “advising” Tunisians on how to be part of the political scene, particularly when their own leadership’s response to the FIS winning the elections was to cancel the elections, arrest over 15,000 of the party’s supporters, thereby triggering a decade of civil war. • Here are four suggestions for any TUNISIAN man or woman particularly concerned about this video, or the Islamists in our country in general—and I am one of them, as I fully support the separation of religion and government. (1) Try to remember what “secularism” has meant in Tunisia for the past half century or even one and a half centuries. (2) Try to understand the psychology of conflict resolution. (3) Look into Ghannouchi’s past as a politician and during the period before he became one. (4) Watch the video using the the above points as your lens for interpreting what Ghannouchi says. • (1) SECULARISM AND THE LAST HALF CENTURY: In general, there are two types of secularism. This is an oversimplification, and we should understand that all states fall somewhere in a spectrum between these two types of secularism. The first type of secularism seeks to protect political life from religious elite and to protect religious life from political elite. Many political demagogues seek to confiscate religious authority by manipulating their followers and exploiting them to impose their own interests.

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    un algérien avisé 2012-12-5

    I can tell you only one thing, my dear Tunisian brothers: Beware! Be very aware!!! You are very close to the abyss of Hell, darkness and massacres. My country was there and it paid the price dearly. It followed the Islamists, who swallowed it up for a good decade in the bowels of Hell. So, do not make the same mistake because I am very much aware of what is currently going on in Tunisia. And, believe me brothers, you are currently taking the same road that we took. May God protect you from their evil.

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    saladin 2012-12-4

    This speech is, unfortunately, negative for Tunisia. Our country is economically and socially fragile. Most movements of factions aren’t aware of the danger that is lurking. The salvation for all of us will only come through stability and work and nothing but work. Tunisia now needs a national pact to protect private and public interests from political bidding tactics and backroom negotiations.

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    djafer 2012-12-2

    Be very vigilant, my dear Tunisian brothers, because evil can result in blind and fanatic Islam, supported with no limits by the Arab servants, principally from Qatar, for the interests of Judeo-Christian financier lobbies. This is worse than a foreign occupation of Tunisia because a foreign occupation would make the people rise up in unison against it. The Islamists will divide the people and it will be more difficult to get them out than Ben Ali. Beware! Warning! Achtung! Be vigilant; otherwise the shadows will swallow the dear and beautiful Tunisia.

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    ابو ادم 2012-12-2

    This interim phase in which the country is going through generated many odd social aspects and uncovered the reality of political movements and their hidden ideological backgrounds and personal ambitions which are in no way associated with people's ambitions that lead to the revolution. All vague slogans have gone off course and are fighting each other in a primitive way dominated by biological desires of an animal nature to the point that green Tunisia has become a jungle where people, at times like wild animals and other times like herbivores, are fighting. These acts are often typical of reptiles' behaviour. All this in the absence of a well educated group of free fair wise nationalists, with a culture which is moral and human not a commercial culture whose mission is boasting, hypocrisy, false opposition, taking advantage of ordinary people, condemning, misinterpreting, empty words meant for sedition and division. As for personal sick desires or achieving the goals of masters and keep on serving them through the principle of loyalty of the slave to his master, I hope that these hypocrites stop. The wise and fair should act to seize the historic opportunity to get us out of slavery to national sovereignty. This can be achieved only through faithfulness to this dear nation regardless of affiliations and ideological backgrounds. Their mission should be nationalism and morals, action and knowledge. Enough theories and defamation, attacking honours, considering that the people are stupid and inflating balloons especially those on the verge of bursting and their parts about to fly away. Every free honest objective nationalist, neither extremist leftist nor extremist rightist, free of the slavery of this world’s desires on top of them money, power and sex should act so that he can contribute to the recovery of this bleeding nation. I hope that loudmouthed and mouthpieces of false propaganda keep quiet and enjoy long-term achievements to let the media, political and social spaces to the competent. It is time for these “wild herbivorous reptiles” to go on forced retirement and let the opportunity for ambitious young people and fair old men while taking the advice of some noble old men and call for the revision of human rights organizations and union which have become old and senile.

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    العربي 2012-12-2

    We have supported the ruling coalition because it is based on the idea that the Tunisian society is a pluralist society ideologically and socially. Therefore, the troika is considered the closest formula to represent Tunisians. This idea began to fade away and here lies the imminent danger. As a reminder, this idea was defended and promoted by the assembly represented by Dr Merzouki and Ghannouchi from Ennahda. Therefore, the world has saluted their endeavour and rewarded them because it understands our condition and unfortunately understands us more than ourselves .

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    moueteze 2012-11-29

    I like the opinions on this page and I will contribute with you in your comments and in expressing ...

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    naj 2012-11-20

    The majority of the Tunisian people voted for Ennahda to re-establish Islam in the country. For a long time, Bourguiba and then Ben Ali wanted to erase the Arab-Muslim identity and culture from the country. They only succeeded with a small urban minority. The rest of the people remained faithful to their values and would love to return to their origins. The salafists are never hypocritical in order to please the colonisers.

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    CHE 2012-10-20

    The same Ghannouchi accuses Nida Tounes led by Beji Caid Essebsi (BCE) of trying to orgalize a coup. BCE had led the democratic transition to fair and free and internationally applauded elections. Ghannouchi himself praised him at that time. So the coup plotter and danger to the republic is Ghannouchi, the friend of the sudanese fundamentalists regimes. By contrasts BCE had prepared the laws setting the independence of the press, the judiciary and the electoral commission. Ghannouchi and the islamists are dangerous for democracy.

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    Moumen 2012-10-18

    The “salafists” – the people who qualify themselves as such – are only Wahabi mercenaries in the services of Judeo-Christian interests. They will remain in the history of the Muslim peoples as the worst traitors, the enemies of Islam. They are the cause of death for millions of innocent Muslims, who have fallen to the most sophisticated weapons of NATO’s and the US’s armies because of the manipulations and betrayals of these beastly “salafist” hordes and other Islamic parties, for whom the chance at gaining power is making their leaders ignorant, completely demented, furious and crazy and giving them psychological complexes. They walk the lobbies and bureaus of the imperialists and their enslaved and evil Lilliputian kinglets to beg of them money and support for their dishonour. They feed their children on shameful, haram money. God is our only ruler!

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    Sehli 2012-10-16

    Beyond the speeches, we are in the midst of a military strategy orchestrated from abroad. This is a foreign conspiracy against the Tunisian state! This conspiracy is the work of Western hegemonic interests, using the ideology and money of Wahhabi monarchies, which are on their last legs and condemned to die out. These Islamic and salafist parties and their leaders are the executors of this strategy to devastate the Muslim states, which have been emancipated from monarchical archaism and which will inevitably emancipate themselves from Western domination. In order to put the brakes on the Tunisian people’s march towards progress, hostile forces reluctant for them to take their matters in their own hands, are unleashing archaic, cruel , power thirsty and money-hungry mercenaries on them to paralyze society and impose their anachronistic law and leave the field open to foreign predators, who will continue to siphon the resources, blood and sweat of the people. We are no longer at the speeches stage, but in the execution of this strategy. Ghannouchi has been executing it since the start, the little perfidious, vain soldier he is. He is taking revenge on his pathetic history, and the rest does not concern him. “After me, the deluge!” Ghannouchi, as usual has been severely off the mark! He is already in the Tunisian people’s rubbish bin of history, who have made so much way despite specimens of his race. But his progeny will continue to bear the reproach for his treason to foreign interests, which are only trying to enslave them to better exploit people, who have so suffered from this domination. The people will win and the thugs – starting with the leaders – will return back to where they should have stayed. The future is for progress, intelligence and emancipation, and never for the traitors of the people!

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    زياد 2012-10-16

    Dogs’ barking doesn’t affect lions.

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